Archive for bible

The Month for Horror Movies

Posted in Movies, Movies and Theatre, Writing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 5, 2016 by urbannight
give-me-what-i-want

Storm of the Century

It is that time of year again.  I love Halloween.  I also like horror movies and I am strangely picky in some ways while being relaxed in other areas.  I read some movie blogs and sometimes post my own movie reviews and mine are not as pretty as others nor do I have a systematic format that I use.  Maybe I should think about that some day.  Not today.

The first movie I watched this October was Steven King’s Storm of the Century.  I bought it from one of those cheap movie bins for 3.75$.  It was a great find for 3.75$.  It was quite good.  I kept asking myself how I managed to miss this in 1999 and how come I never saw it since.

Tim Daly did a great job as a constable of a tiny town.  The town being so small that the town manager and equivalent of sheriff/chief of police actually don’t have enough official work to pay them full time that they have to have full time day jobs as well is kind of amusing.  Since the constable also owns the grocery, it is mighty handy that the ‘jail’ is in back of it with a joining door.  What would happen if the constable wasn’t the owner of the store as well?  Or am I the only one who thinks of these things?  And maybe I missed it but the constable was really handy with the Bible quotes and I never figured out why.

Colm Feore was really creepy as the villain.  They managed to do a great deal with minimal makeup.  Occasionally his eyes went solid black.  The animal-like teeth are particularily effective.  It wasn’t the normal vampire type monster teeth. It is what a human mouth might look like if dog teeth were set in a human jaw.  The weird steel-like coloring made it more disturbing.  The make-up to make him look ancient was pretty good.  But he was more scary with his normal looks since he had such a smooth face and even complexion.  The only thing that was odd was that it is suggested that he was ‘Legion’ from the Bible but Legion was a whole collection of demons as the man who was possessed was possessed by more than one.  Yet Feore’s character seemed to be one being that was once human and that he was a representation of something that was passed down from one person to another since the earliest times of mankind.  But he is never clearly explained.  The ‘Legion’ explanation was weak in my opinion.

The town manager really annoys me the most.  He acts like he owns the town rather than being an elected official.  He acts like he owns the town and that his word is law and that he owns the people in charge of the actual law.  The pissed me off and I thought he was the least believable character in the entire film.

The rest of the story is good, although character development is weak.  I understand that by taking so long to finally tell the people what he wants all the while scaring people by telling their secrets and controlling people to cause them to kill themselves or others helps whip the town into a fearful frenzy, I found it still unbelievable that they would agree so easily to just hand over a child.  This was the least believable part of the film.  But the aftermath voice over that tells what happens in the years after is what really makes this film.  After spending three nights with these characters and having the time between episodes to think about things, that follow up at the end of the film is perhaps the most important part.  We see some of the real fallout of the towns actions.  And I did watch it in three spaced out sessions rather than in one sitting.  More by accident that a deliberate plan.

I will watch this again.  It was good and enjoyable.  Very few horror films enter the realm of ‘great’.  So I never expect that level out of any horror movie.

 

 

 

The Mark of Cain. The obvious thing no one noticed….

Posted in Writing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 23, 2014 by urbannight

The other night I was reading/watching things online.  Somehow, I ended up on an article about the various possibilities for the mark of Cain.  This is what I remember.

Cain kills Abel and God is sending him away.  But Cain is worried that everyone will know what he did and try to kill him.  So God promises to put a mark on him that will show everyone that he is protected by God.

Some of the various things that have been suggested for the Mark have been Black skin, Red hair, and Left-handedness.

Everyone seems to  be ignoring the elephant in the room.  If Cain killed Abel and they were the only children of Adam and Eve at this point, who does Cain think might kill him?  He is being sent away, so it can’t have been Adam or Eve.

Since a lot of Christians are never taught about Lilith, or her monster children, it probably isn’t any of them.

There are some writers out there advocating that genetics were still ‘pure’ back then and Cain marries an unnamed sister and, in fact, Adam and Eve had a lot more children of both genders and the world is populated by one inbred family.

Since he was worrying about being murdered before he even found a wife, I won’t really worry about that one too much.  I just had to mention that one theory because it was way out there in terms of strangeness.

Back in the day, when I was going to church, teaching Sunday school, reading the Bible through about 4 times a year, and doing a lot of study and research on the things I really thought were odd, this story was one of the oddest to me.  When there are only four people on the planet, if you believe a literal interpretation, then who did Cain think would murder him?

Either mystery people who came from someplace else or a whole tribe of brothers and sisters that are never mentioned.  The only other named son being the one born to replace Abel.

And, why in the world is God protecting a Murderer anyway?  Did no one ever think to ask this?  It seems a very bizarre course of action.  Another one of those questions where all attempts to answer it are so bizarre that you wonder why that question alone does not drive people away from Churches.