Archive for Thanksgiving

No Christmas Movies before Thanksgiving

Posted in Entertainment, Holiday, Movies and Theatre, Writing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 2, 2016 by urbannight

not-christmas-yetI like movies and watch a lot thanks to Netflix being WAY cheaper than cable.  I miss a few shows I like but it is much more affordable this way.  Because of that I have a few movie blogs I follow.  Today, only two days after Halloween, a Christmas movie review popped up in my feeds.

No thank you, I deleted it.  No Christmas before Thanksgiving.  It is bad enough seeing it in the stores before Halloween.  About the same time they start setting up for Halloween, the stores start to clear out and set up the Christmas tree section.  Some stores wait until after Halloween and use that space for the Christmas decorations.  Other stores, bigger store, I’m calling you out Wal-Mart, actually started putting out decorations before Halloween as well.

So I really don’t want to start seeing Christmas reviews before Thanksgiving.  I’m just not mentally prepared for it yet.  I’m not ready for Halloween to be over. I haven’t even thought about Thanksgiving.  It isn’t time to be torturing us with early Christmas propaganda.  We are still having the occasionally 70 something day out.  Non-specific winter movies seem to early now.

One exception I might make, Christmas time horror movies.  That seems like a natural bridge from Halloween to Christmas.  I always wanted to watch the 2006 remake of Black Christmas.black-christmas-2006-poster

Turkey Day at Work

Posted in Food, Holiday, Work with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 15, 2012 by urbannight

Today we have our turkey day at work.  The higher-ups get a Thanksgiving lunch catered in to us.  Despite bringing my camera to work, I totally forgot about it until I finished my meal.  Such sadness.  But I found some pictures that might do it justice.

The stuffing it the best part of the meal from these particular caterers. A drizzle of gravy, a dash of pepper, and you are done. No need to add salt to this dish. I always go back for seconds even though I shouldn’t. I will tell you why later.

I grew up being a potatoes girl.  As an adult, I’ve learned the joys of stuffing.  When I make my own, I start with stove top turkey stuffing.  I take the neck and giblets and cook them.  I add garlic, onion, celery seed to this pot.  It comes out like I put a proper garni bundle in with them without the fuss.  Then I dice them up, pull the meat off the neck, and use it in the stuffing.  I use a bit of the turkey juices to mix with the broth for the stuffing, toss in the meat, and add more sage, pepper, and cayenne to the mix.  Other wise, I just make according to the package.  Now, if I was able to skim off enough stuff from the pot of water in which I cooked the organs, I’ll use that water. It has to look like a good stock.   If it looks too ‘dirty’ then I’ll just use a chicken broth.  More often lately, I just use the chicken broth.

They make very good potatoes. I would say that, for the most part, you can’t ruin mashed potatoes. But the restaurants in Omaha manage to do just that. They leave nasty lumps in them to ‘prove’ they are real potatoes. I’m from Idaho, where the rule of thumb is that lumps in the potatoes are a sign of a lazy cook. Growing up, my job was the mashed potatoes. I used a hand masher and we didn’t add butter to the mix. We added two capfuls of milk to 5 potatoes. That was it.

I went back for seconds on the potatoes too.  Although, the way I’m feeling, I should have just had the seconds on the stuffing.

The corn was mixed with parsley. It was good corn. Touch of salt and pepper perfected it. But it wasn’t stand out corn. Just good average corn.

Add that to the dinner rolls, which were 5 different kinds of classy dinner rolls, the meal was 4 starches and one meat.  It could have used some sides that were less of a pure starch than these.  Corn at least had that clear hull over the kernel that is pure fiber.  Although the meat of the kernel has enough sugar starch that, like the potatoes, you really ought to count it as a bread serving rather than a veggie serving when balancing a meal.

This is where the meal falls apart. The turkey is just bad turkey. Every year. I couldn’t find a picture of turkey that looked as blah and bland as the turkey they serve.

They use those turkey breasts, of course.  They don’t cook enough whole turkeys for an office our size.  It’s much easier for caterers to use the packaged breasts.  But it tastes like they are using the chopped, processed stuff.  It definitely tastes like the kind that is injected with saline to plump it up and make it look good.  And even with the gravy, salt, and pepper, it still manages to taste awful.  I don’t know why I take a slice every time.  I guess I keep hoping that it will taste better this year.

The gravy is a very indifferent gravy.  Nothing special, very pale, very bland.  No seasoning at all.  It tastes okay on the potatoes with a bit of salt and pepper.  It tastes great on the stuffing with a bit of pepper.  It manages enhance the stuffing without masking any of the wonderful flavor of the stuffing.  It does NOTHING for the turkey, as I mentioned.

Now, as to why I make sure I get seconds . . . .

They seem to use two different caterers for Thanksgiving and Christmas.  And one of them does not leave the leftovers.  They take it away with them.  Where it goes, I don’t know.  Maybe a food kitchen.  The thing is, the company pays for it all.  All the other catered events leave the food and we set up a second buffet the next day.  The entire office usually gets two meals out of what all the caterers send us for one meal.  No wonder Americans are so fat if everyone thinks that this is what people eat in one meal (rather than two).   SO, with stuffing THAT FANTASTIC, (so fantastic, I even like the celery in it and I hate cooked celery), I do make a point of getting seconds on the stuffing.

I worked out last night, I’ll go work out tonight.  I’ll try to burn off the second helping off stuffing.